About Carl Weinschenk

Carl Weinschenk

Carl Weinschenk is an IT and telecommunications journalist with extensive industry experience. He's written for CableWorld, Internet Week and many other publications. He's currently a contributor to Broadband Technology Report and he also runs Weinschenk Editorial Services.

Beginning a post on cyber security with the observation that the threat being discussed is frightening is a bit redundant. They all are frightening. Very often, today’s threats are more dangerous because they are a mix of multiple things that, when combined, are more potent than the sum of their parts. In this case, four elements are present: botnets, DDoS attacks, the internet of things (IoT) and connected consumer electronics equipment. Put together, these inexpensive ingredients are enough to threaten the internet …
Read the full post
The world of cybersecurity is a scary one. It’s especially so when it comes to vehicles. The reason is simple: In other areas of security, the end game generally is lost money or the inconvenience of getting a new credit card. In vehicle hacking, what’s at stake can actually be physical safety. It’s bad enough to lose a few bucks. It’s quite another thing to lose one’s brakes ...
Read the full post
There are many reasons – some subtle and some overt – that explain why security professionals wake up in a cold sweat from time to time. The bottom lines are simple: The IoT has permeated deeply within everyday life, it won’t be easy to secure and the clock is ticking ...
Read the full post
A very scary thing happened last month in California. An entity – perhaps a team in Turkey, though their claim of responsibility can’t be verified – took control of the computer system at Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center. They encrypted the files for a week and only decrypted them after $17,000 worth of bitcoins were paid, according to International Business Times. Ransomware – encrypting data in a target system and only releasing it when a bounty is paid – is particularly frightening because ...
Read the full post

It's a rare thing when two technologies evolve along completely separate tracks but end up complementing each other so completely that they seem as if they developed together. But that is the serendipitous situation in which disaster recovery/business continuity (DR/BC) and cloud computing find themselves. Geographic diversity defines the cloud and is a best practice in DR/BC. The best way to increase the odds that a company's services won’t go down – and to ensure that they get back up as quickly as possible if they indeed do – is storing data and applications in more than one place. That, at its core, is the definition of cloud computing ...

Read the full post