Posts about Data Traffic

Author’s Note: There’s a lot of talk and plenty of noise related to NFV in the telecom industry. It’s a time of market transformation with many executives and marketers making claims for how their companies are doing NFV better than others, or how they are ahead of the competition in one or more ways. I think we are missing an important voice: The CTOs ...
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Nearly the entire history of enterprise networking has been about streamlining and optimizing north/south communications; that is, from the user to the server to storage and back again. To be sure, east/west architectures between various data resources have existed for some time, but in most cases their load requirements have been modest. That all started to change around the turn of the century as distributed architectures and virtualization added complexity and abstraction to the once "simple" data environments that ruled the enterprise. Today, east/west communication is driven by a plethora of developments, such as virtual desktops, parallel and multi-threaded workloads, new generations of machine-to-machine and intelligent resource management solutions, plus automated mirroring and replication between storage arrays. To make matters even more challenging, the enterprise is now looking to duplicate this functionality in the cloud, enabling not just communication between data centers, but between servers and virtual machines within those data centers. Small wonder, then, that traditional hierarchical networking architectures are giving way to fabric-based constructs. A good place to catch a glimpse of the future is Amazon. The company has kept its self-made infrastructure rather close to the vest, but Network World's Brandon Butler gleaned some of the details from ...
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Some of the hottest web startups have been child-shuttling services such as Shuddle and HopSkipDrive. It's very inefficient for each parent to drive every single child to each activity. It usually doesn't take very long for new parents to start working with others on carpooling, especially when there are conflicting activities in different places all at the same time. A similar problem/solution exists in the online world as well. If an individual subscriber has an account for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Netflix, etc., it's very inefficient for each cloud service provider to go through their network to an Internet exchange point, through a point of presence, and sometimes across a national or even global backbone and back again, all to serve that single user. It makes much more sense for Internet content and cloud services providers to directly connect to one another for subscriber sharing. Yes, they're competitors, and yes, their subscriber information is proprietary and not for sharing, but when two servers are near each other in San Francisco, it makes no sense to have their packets travel the world to connect together. This direct connection between competing service providers for subscriber sharing is called "peering", and it's nothing new. Early train stations housed competing railroad companies so that passengers could be swapped over. Before the digitalization of voice calls ...
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The telecommunications market is facing disruption from all directions as the traditional roles of the communications, broadcast and IT industries converge. This convergence is enabling new services and business models, but also a reinvention of the telco into a new type of CSP that is decidedly different to the traditional model. This new CSP is also a full-service IT provider – in which traditional telco services run over the data network with an increased focus on business-to-business services ...
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Last week, an interesting study was published by Musictank, entitled “The Dark Side of the Tune: The Hidden Energy cost of Digital Music Consumption”. The report examines the environmental impact from an energy efficiency and carbon foot-print view, of the current shifts in content consumption from an “ownership of physical product” towards “access via cloud-based content services”.
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