Posts about Peering

2015 was a seminal year for data center interconnect (DCI) technology. It was the year that ever increasing spending by big data center operators and Internet content providers finally made the communications industry take note. No longer second fiddle to large Tier 1 Service Providers, large data centers were finally heard when they said “we need something different”. And the optical communications industry responded in a big way, not just tweaking existing products, but launching entirely new product lines to serve their big needs (and big spend). But if DCI hype reigned supreme for 2015, what does 2016 have in store for us all? Well, with the disclaimer that one predicts the future at his own peril, there are 5 major trends that I think show signs of being huge for DCI in 2016: 1. Power Efficiency Will Continue to Dominate - Power efficiency has always been important to DCI and it will stay on the agenda in 2016. Data center operators have plenty of money and space, just not power. They are literally building underfilled warehouses in the hopes that future power efficiency gains will allow them to fill them to capacity ...

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Some of the hottest web startups have been child-shuttling services such as Shuddle and HopSkipDrive. It's very inefficient for each parent to drive every single child to each activity. It usually doesn't take very long for new parents to start working with others on carpooling, especially when there are conflicting activities in different places all at the same time. A similar problem/solution exists in the online world as well. If an individual subscriber has an account for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Netflix, etc., it's very inefficient for each cloud service provider to go through their network to an Internet exchange point, through a point of presence, and sometimes across a national or even global backbone and back again, all to serve that single user. It makes much more sense for Internet content and cloud services providers to directly connect to one another for subscriber sharing. Yes, they're competitors, and yes, their subscriber information is proprietary and not for sharing, but when two servers are near each other in San Francisco, it makes no sense to have their packets travel the world to connect together. This direct connection between competing service providers for subscriber sharing is called "peering", and it's nothing new. Early train stations housed competing railroad companies so that passengers could be swapped over. Before the digitalization of voice calls ...
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The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted yesterday to support a series of rules that we more commonly reference as “Net Neutrality.” These rules will reclassify broadband Internet access as a Title II telecommunications service, subjecting them to regulation similar to that of a utility or common carrier. The concern driving Net Neutrality has focused on consumer broadband access and networks, highlighting such notions as blocking of internet sites and throttling of traffic such as BitTorrent. However, some of the associated headlines really have nothing to do with the access part of the network. Instead, they are related to network interconnects, which are the lurking issue under much of what we call Net Neutrality...


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