Posts about VNI

I’m excited about the potential of gigabit broadband services, but I also know it is unlikely my current broadband service provider will offer these kinds of speeds within this decade or perhaps even next. If I should be so lucky to have access to gigabit speeds (heck, I would be happy with 50Mbps) in the foreseeable future, it will likely be provided through my own city government in some form of a public-private partnership.
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It's almost impossible to open a tech publication or even a mainstream publication and not find a discussion about the continued fierce growth in mobile data and hyperbole on the consequences. Only this weekend the FT featured a discussion on the U.K.'s 'capacity crunch' and how networks will (or more to the point, won't) cope in 2030 when we're consuming 300 times more mobile data than today. I'm amazed that some people are already discussing the failure of networks that are eighteen years away.
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Over the past few weeks there have been a number of reports on the state of mobile broadband and the amount of mobile data being generated. While some of these reports have centred upon headline-grabbing figures aimed clearly at making the mobile industry panic, others have taken a more reserved approach. This fluctuation of figures is something that continually fascinates me and at times suggests a slight disconnect between the different bodies within the mobile ecosystem. Yet one of the key questions facing the industry is how to assimilate this data and find an effective middle path.
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There can be few people in the tech industry who have not been drawn into discussions on the impact of Apple’s announcements at this week’s Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC). The launch of the company’s iCloud service has once again raised debate as to network capacity, especially from a mobile perspective. This news comes less than a week after the release of Cisco’s VNI report that highlights mobile traffic is already anticipated to increase 26-fold by 2015. As Apple moves gradually into the cloud, there can be no question that this figure will only increase.
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