I first came across the reference to Super-PON back in 1996 at an IEEE Communications Society Conference. At that time, Super-PON was described as supporting a split ratio of 1:1024 at a range of 100km. The overall network capacity of the Super-PON was 2.5Gbit/s TDM downstream and 300Mbit/s ATM-based TDMA upstream and it introduced the concept of optical amplifiers along the fiber paths. At the time this was particularly forward thinking, as the only PON systems that had been deployed were BPON systems supporting a split ratio of 32 subscribers and a capacity of 622Mbit/s / 155Mbit/s. For reference, GPON can support a split ratio up to 1:64 at a range of 20km with a network capacity of 2.5Gbit/s / 2.5Gbit/s ...

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Inflexible and monolithic transport network solutions are little use when it comes to meeting the agile connectivity requirements of the cloud, 5G and IoT. Networks must be able to respond immediately to changing bandwidth needs. Complex network planning and time-consuming, failure-prone manual provisioning processes are no longer an option. Networks need to support and eventually replace slow processes with automation and intelligent control ...

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More and more, we are encouraged to be mindful of our energy use and with its increasing cost, I dare say, it’s become somewhat difficult to ignore. Naturally, cost isn’t just a contributing factor to our need to become greener and to reduce our overall energy consumption, whether that’s for water, electricity or gas – we are indeed reminded that there isn’t an unlimited supply ...

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Posted by Ulrich Kohn on October 01, 2018

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Imagine you have developed a video to promote network neutrality. As you upload it to a video server, the network does not establish the required connection. You want to know what the problem is, so you ask: “Hi network, what’s wrong?” The response comes as a surprise: “The content of this video conflicts with my interests; I do not want you to upload this video!” This is autonomous networking! The network has its own identity and agenda; it acts according to its own interests ...

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Telecommunications networks are undergoing radical and long-term change. It's a gradual process. But it's certain that the changes are accelerating and growing more extreme. The reason is simple: End users want to use the networks to do far more demanding and sophisticated things than before. Consider facial identification used to identify potential terrorists at airports. The network supporting such a system must serve up enough bandwidth and be close enough to databases to perform the task between the time a person checks in and boards the plane. It must do this many times a minute ...

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