Posts about Network Edge

Amid all of the technological and architectural changes taking place in data infrastructure heading into 2019, the elephant in the room is the internet of things. Even without the prospect of millions – no, billions – of connected devices feeding data back to processing centers, and vice versa, the world was on a trajectory of exponentially larger volumes every year. Now, that process has been kicked into even higher gear, and networks are on the front lines in the effort to keep it all on track ...

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Did you visit any of this year’s major communication conferences? If so, I’m sure you noted service providers and vendors talking a lot about the increasing relevance of the network edge. There’s a common understanding that powerful edge servers will soon be hosting virtual network functions and control processes in proximity to the customer or an enterprise appliance. But what might look like a logical complement to central clouds needs to be seen as a disruptive change to long-standing network design best practices, with complexity being centralized to create economies of scale and operational savings. So what created this shift in network architectural preferences and how will this unfold next year?
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There’s more than one way to migrate a metro network from 10Gbit/s aggregated bandwidth to 100Gbit/s. At first, you might consider data center leaf/spine switches, expecting significant cost savings from volume-deployed devices. However, on second thought, there may be some concerns. Those devices are optimized for a very specific application, which doesn’t necessarily makes them the perfect solution for other use cases ...

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Communication service providers will remember the days when service innovation cycles took many months or even years. The process was long and troublesome, starting with the operator’s idea for a new service, followed by detailed technical discussions with the network supplier, feasibility studies and estimations of related development efforts. Contracts for feature extensions were signed. As new hardware became available, system integration and testing had to be performed. Finally, a new service could be launched. By this stage, many months or even years had passed and the conditions that made the service attractive in the first place may no longer exist ...

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